Tall, Dark and Handsome: Highland Park 18

Music: The Tragically Hip, “The Darkest One”

This is an example of why you should have whisky friends (of course, aside from the fact that whisky is best enjoyed with friends): trading samples. As a boy, I traded hockey cards. Now that I’m older, I trade whisky. Perhaps the best way to expand one’s whisky knowledge without spending a bunch of money.

A sample of the Highland Park 18yo came to me via a trade for a sample of the 2012 Lagavulin 12yo cask strength, and a sample of the Highland Park 10yo (40%).

Nose: Rich. Bready. Floral, Fruit salad, apples, malt and sherry in the back ground. Molasses and peat smoke.
Opens up with 3 drops of water.

Palate: Plent viscous. Sponge toffee. Oatmeal and brown sugar. Smoke and molasses. Cherries, chocolate, peat and spearmint.

Finish: Medium-long, warming. Pepper, cherry stones, sponge toffee and smoke.

Grade: A-

The reviews are right in that this dram is the most balanced one flavour-wise. It has a little bit of everything, and in that way its remarkable. It’s also balanced between nose and palate. At 46%, this dram would likely be an A. For all the nitpicking, I’ll join in the chorus to say that the Highland Park 18yo is one damn fine dram.

“Where the wild are strong, and the strong are the darkest ones… and you’re the darkest one.”

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A Youngen, But a Good’en: Highland Park 10

Music: Jethro Tull, “Locomotive Breath”

I’m so often loath to lend a liver to these releases; the younger, weaker, attempts to make one’s stock stretch amidst growing demand. I had always figured I’d patronize these bottlings when all that is good in the Scotch world had either run dry, or was so far out of my price range that I have no other reasonable choice. However, I had heard good things about the HP 10yo from fellow whisky lovers, and at $60, it seemed worth a try. Now, to be fair, the HP12 used to be $60. Sadly, it is now $70 (a price it reached within a year), and it seems that for HP, the prices are already starting to take off. In hopes of picking up a reliable “daily dram”, I decided to give the HP a go.

Nose: Wow. This is 40%? Really? Given the recent night with some high-end Chivas, the big boys should take notice. HP’s new stuff is big. Honey heather and sponge toffee (think Crunchie Bar) like crazy. American Oak on the forefront, fudge and salted caramels. Give it some time and you get oranges and green apples. Also a hint of smoked bacon with some corn syrup.

Palate: About as viscous as the HP12, but enough for a 40%-er at 10 years. Honey biscuits, sponge toffee. Sea salt. Peat smoke and tart green apples.

Finish: Medium finish, light smokiness, bready, sweet and a tad tart.

Grade: B

At the (North American) Highland Park Standard of 43%, this would probably kick. I hear the cask strength is amazing (the whisky live bottling was 59.3%). This is one of those guaranteed daily drams. Fits the profile and the pocketbook. Of course, I really love HP, and to boot, I love a good clean American Oak whisky. If I want my thick sherried whiskies and my dark peat monsters, I know where to look. A good clean American Oak whisky isn’t so easy to find in these parts, at these prices. In that role, the HP 10 will have a spot in my cabinet for a while…

“Old Charlie stole the handle, and the train it won’t stop going–no way to slow down.”